Pankhurst Gallery | Meet Julia
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Art was an obvious path for
Julia right from a young age.

After Art school she would spend hot summer days drawing portraits on high streets as Julia has always had the ability to draw what she sees, but lacking direction at that point in her young life the art took a back seat.
 Julia’s artistic flare manifested in many ways other than just art (very much like her Father who was also an artist). One of them was hairdressing, even from a young teenager she started building a clientele and being a ‘people person’ the hairdressing seemed a very straight forward vocation for her.
This eventually lead Julia to the Naval Base Portsmouth where she started her own barbers shop, which is still running today. Julia’s attention though has now turned much more to  the art again and to the side of her that has laid dormant for such a long time.
 At the end of 2010 Julia started to draw portraits again and displayed them on her barbers shop wall. These drew attention again to her painting and drawing abilities again and she had a few nudges from ships captain’s to start painting ships.
Deciding to ‘give it a go’, Julia’s first maritime/seascape painting was finished in Jan 2011 ‘All Quiet at Twilight’  (HMS Ark Royal in acrylics) and was shown to the captain where she was then invited to show it at the ships last open weekend in Portsmouth before the decommissioning.
That weekend 11,000 went passed by the painting and many prints were ordered.  A second painting of HMS Ark Royal  ‘Farewell Ark Royal’ was unveiled at the decommissioning in March 2011, and from that time until now everything has been one huge explosion of unexpected doors opening for Julia and everything has progressed much faster than she ever imagined.
Julia’s portfolio of work is diversifying, and although her primary passion is painting the ever changing mood of the sea,  sometimes the subject might not be a warship, but something more lighthearted a portrait of a cow.